Political and social art shown off by students in Farnham

Friday 1st July 2022 11:00 am
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Painting by Isobelle Munckton
Isobelle Munckton’s painting (Isobelle Munckton )

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Art students from UCA Farnham and UAL Central Saint Martins have been showing their work in an exhibition called Continuum at Lion and Lamb Yard in Farnham.

Most are studying fine art, with some doing film and photography, and the exhibition included sculptures, photographs, paintings plus many other art forms.

The pieces expressed political and personal struggles of society such as injustice, the male gaze and social alienation.

Many students drew their ideas from personal experience.

Artist Isobelle Munckton, whose canvas painting is pictured, said: “Most of my work is about the relationship between humans and nature.

“With things like climate change and creatures having their homes destroyed, I like to make people aware – and I like to do it in a joyful way.”

Naomi Escott’s piece called Untethered used natural materials such as wax and cotton as she wanted to create something with “the fewest ingredients in it” to encourage viewers to look at things for what they are.

She said her work represented “the static position we can find ourselves in within our lives”.

Emily Williams produced a sculpture and a canvas focusing on consumerism.

She said her painting Nothing Governs Like Fear showed how big-name brands were the power in today’s society. The sculpture, I Want – You Will Never Get comprises receipts from cheap brands with expensive designer-brand logos printed on them.

Lucy Branscombe’s Little Red’s Adolescence uses puppets and dolls to show how childhood innocence can be stolen by sexual predators – to underline the point, Little Red is reading Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.

She said a wolf puppet creeping up on Little Red had blood around his mouth “to represent the previous victims he has preyed on”.

Continuum, which ran from June 20 until last Sunday, was sobering art showcasing the impact of today’s events on tomorrow’s leaders.

Curator Katie Karcheski said the artists intended to “return to Farnham in the coming months”.

Alfred Robins

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